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Search Results 0 to 36 of about 37 (some duplicates have been removed)
. >> the negotiation of some kind is necessary. >> whichever option you favor. this >> let me go northwest to syria. syria was discussed in the presidential campaign but the more it was discussed there and less difference there seemed to be between the two candidate. it came down to should we be arming the opposition? let me ask that question in a broader context? should we are mccumber opposition and whenever answer to that question is what is the strategic approach to the syrian conflict that preserves or protect american interests at this stage? >> let me begin and that end. the american international -- american position on foreign affairs was for in the aftermath of the second world war, the united states had a position of predominance that was unique in human history and transitory as other nations developed that degree of pre-eminence. at the same time the single most powerful country in the world, and the key to stupidity in many regions and the key to progress in many regions and when you say you are no longer preeminent you have to be able to establish priorities and when you establish pr
, in syria's civil war. what happened? >> that's right, wolf. syrian activists say at least 45 people were killed in two car bombings outside the capital of damascus. that city has been a sanctuary for pro-regime forced to flee their homes. the rebels have claimed to down three fighter jets in the past 24 hours. we'll speak with cnn's arwa damon from northern syria later this hour. a federal judge is ordering tobacco companies to publicly admit they deceived americans about the dangers of smoking. the court ruled big tobacco should print on the box and advertisements. it's not clear if tobacco companies will appeal this decision. and the self-described king of motivation has died at the age of 86 years old. zig ziglar best known for his seminars and more than two dozen books on salesmanship. he died in dallas after getting pneumonia. he had quite an influence. he had 30 books or so over the course of his life. >> quite a following. thanks very much, lisa, for that. >>> republican raise eyebrows when he said he might break the anti-tax pledge. that statement could also draw him into getting
will prepare, considering, no, potentially success of the operation against the facility in syria. and that this may hold iran's restraints to acquire nuclear weapons. so we are in really concerned with situation, and let me add that people of iran will continue to suffer under very tough sanctions. so, there are two things which must change, diplomacy and inspections. first diplomacy. p5+1 has served as united front. five plus one means to me united nations, security council related, global responsibility to europeans like to prefer 3+3, which means the european union is the main player. i'm a little nervous about if you're in europe you had better say three plus the otherwise you will not be served dinner. [laughter] but i think it is, five plus one of course is important to keep on. but i think u.s. should not do, u.s. does not hide inside this group. u.s. has now time to take responsibility. and to change, to start with its relations with iran. isn't it time now, they give up on the occupation of the u.s. embassy in connection with islamic revolution of 1979. should also the i
of the entire region. syria, and the disorder spills across the neighborhood. joining us again, and fbi supervisory agent. you see that as late? >> what is happening in syria, you have to look at it from a few different perspectives. first you have the syrian people who want freedom from bashar al-assad's regime. then you have regional conflict that is going on. this is between iran and turkey. turkey is supporting the iranian people and iran is supporting the regime. you also have to look at it on a different level. where you have russia and china also involved on global levels with the syrian conflict. it is becoming a war of shadows and a war of different phones. the problem with that is that syria is a multicultural society. you have the christians and shiites and sunnis so if a civil war took place in syria, with all of these entities fighting with each other, that is still into the entire region. you will see it in lebanon and we will see an indication that the syrian conflict is still into lebanon. also, there is about 20 million involved in the clan and that's that. jenna: this
. the problem with that is that syria is a multicultural society. you have the christians and shiites and sunnis so if a civil war took place in syria, with all of these entities fighting with each other, that is still into the entire region. you will see it in lebanon and we will see an indication that the syrian conflict is still into lebanon. also, there is about 20 million involved in the clan and that's that. jenna: this has been going back for centuries. how we engage with that? remapped welcome of, the problem that has been happening today in syria, there is no one to fill the vacuum of bashar al-assad's falling. the new coalition of the opposition -- the syrian opposition, they get together and they elected a leader. that leadership is not a leadership that has been outside syria for 20 years. it is for people who actually were in syria until recently. jenna: there are questions about that leadership and whether it is genuine or whether or not it is the second in command, the muslim brotherhood member is someone that should be looked at again. thomas friedman makes this argument today th
will be visiting the western battleground state of colorado later in this "journal." >> rebels in syria have reportedly killed 28 government soldiers. the rebels attacked three army checkpoints on the main road from damascus to aleppo. five rebels also died in the clashes. >> human rights groups are reporting government attacks in and around the syrian capital wednesday. it is thought this video shows a syrian army jet bombing a rebel area not far from the city. some positive unemployment numbers coming out of the united states five days ahead of the presidential election. payroll processing company adp says the u.s. economy added 150,000 jobs in october, the biggest gain since february. >> official figures from the government are to be released tomorrow. the unemployment rate in the u.s. remains just below 8%, much higher than before the onset of the financial crisis that in 2008. those job figures pushed stocks up on both sides of the atlantic on thursday. our correspondent sent us this round up. than any better than expected situation at the job market in the u.s. is a very good sign, not
continues to grow more powerful economically and politically. the civil war in syria is just one example of how beijing can exert its influence. they will also have to address domestic issues such as income disparity, environmental pollution, and corruption, to name just a few. on thursday, the party will unveil the new bureau and standing committee, the party's innermost during a power. that will complete the changing of the guard at the top until the next party congress. >> in business news, rwe has released quarterly results. germany's second largest power company has posted strong profits despite the slowdown in the eurozone. >> the biggest competitor eon shocked investors yesterday, but rwe is having no such problems. the company says it is having a good year, despite germany was a switch to more renewals and the debt crisis. in fact, rwe has raised its forecast for the year as a whole. >> for more, let's bring in our markets correspondent, who is standing by on the floor of the frankfurt stock exchange. how are investors reacting? >> the stock price of rwe is trading slightly lower
of their rights eventually. >> thanks so much. to syria now. the country has gone offline. according to a firm that monitors global internet traffic, syrian public tv has claimed it is the work of terrorists, but activists speculate the syrian government is responsible. >> the civil conflict grinds on. this footage reportedly shows air strikes. outside damascus, rebels are reported to have blocked the road between the capital and its nearby airport. activists also said at least 10 people were killed in an air strike on a level. the body writing egypt's new constitution has been voting on the final draft. >> the assembly is signing off on that document bit by bit. they voted controversially to keep islamic law as the main source of legislation. most of the political opposition is boycotting the assembly. the document aims to transfer more power to egypt's parliament. critics say it is being rammed through too hastily. critics have already gathered where the president is expected to make an announcement. british lawmakers are looking at new ways to regulate the press. the calls for tougher guide
of the week. deadly fighting in syria reportedly left at least 63 people dead across the country tuesday, including 41 in the capital damascus. syrian tanks continue to shell the palestinian refugee camp which has seen heavy violence this month. france has become the first western country to recognize syria's newly brokered opposition coalition as the sole representative of the syrian people. the coalition was formed over the weekend at a summit in doma. at least 24 people at and killed and more than 100 wounded in a series of bombings across iraq. a multiple explosions were reported in at least four different areas, including baghdad and kirkuk. israel and palestinian leaders in gaza have agreed to attack -- agreed to a tacit truce following days of violence in the gaza strip. at least seven palestinians have been killed in israeli attacks on gaza since saturday. eight israeli civilians have also been wounded by palestinian rockets. the temporary ceasefire was brokered by the egyptian government, but both sides say they're prepared to resume attacks if it fails. the united nations gener
, lebanon, and syria. he also seemed to have quite a bit of ties to iran and was known to (inaudible) for the hamas regime. israel, of course, when we saw him -- only saw him as a mastermind of what they called terror attacks. he was said to be the person behind the kidnapping of israeli soldier gilad that hraoet. and in the photograph the shalits released, you can see him standing there. >> what do we know about what's going on inside gaza, whether they're preparing for war, whether they're standing by for a possible land incursion? >> the people i spoke in in gaza today describe confusion and chaos. i spoke to one gentleman in the northern part of gaza who has four children and he said as he was moving towards the center he saw shells and went back home. in problem is that no one in gaza knows where it's safe right now. the air strikes that started earlier in the afternoon are scattered in areas. so people are scared that they're in the midst of another war and one they're not prepared for. >> suarez: just in the past few hours the israeli cabinet has authorized a callup of reservi
not have the divisions we are facing in syria. i so far there are issues that they are facing but i think we should have hope and faith and i think with the political settlement this should provide a ground for hope in the future. thank you. >> thank you. greg. >> i would like to echo dan in thanking you all for coming out on this very dreary day especially after a holiday for i'm sure many of you. and thanks to you as well for staying up a little late and giving us his great insight. as all of us know, the united states has just been through a presidential election. president barack obama was reelected. and the obama administration had a number of i think foreign policy and counter terrorism successes during the first administration obviously osama bin laden was killed in the special operations raid. president obama has overseen the drawdown of troops in iraq as well as in afghanistan. and yet i think one of the most lasting legacies from the first term of the obama administration may well be what u.s. officials term the yemen model. this is sort of how it is that the u.s. is going to fi
have had a tense relationship since hamas supported the uprising in syria. what's that relationship and what's iran's role right now? >> absolutely. there are sectarian issues here. iran is predominantly shiite and hamas is predominantly sunni. the leader of hamas moved headquarters out of damascus and sided with the opposition. there is that real tension. in many ways, gaza reflects the kind of rivalry playing out in syria and elsewhere in the region. hamas relies on iran for military training and its most important weaponry, but there is this tension over syria. it's in syria's interest right now to see all the world's attention focused on gaza rather than on damascus to take some of the pressure off. these relationships in the region are shifting. part of what we're seeing, little gaza, it's important not just for what happens on israeli issues but the wider dynamics of the shifting sands across the middle east. >> let me ask you a question about what happens with hamas, depending how this plays out. there's one theory, dennis ross from the washington institute of near east polic
displayed in the face of what were initially peaceful protests. obviously the situation in syria has deteriorated since then. we have been extensively engage with the international community as well as regional powers to help the opposition. we have committed to hundreds of millions of dollars of humanitarian aid to help folks both inside of syria and outside of syria. we are constantly consulting with the opposition on how they can get organized so that they are not splintered and divided in the face of the onslaught from the assad regime. we are in very close contact with countries like turkey and jordan that immediately border syria and have an impact, and, obviously, israel, which is having already raised concerns as we do about, for example, movement of chemical weapons that might occur in such a chaotic atmosphere. and i could have an impact not just within syria, but on the region as a whole. i'm encouraged to see that the syrian opposition created an umbrella group that may have more cohesion than they've had in the past. we are going to be talking to them. my envoys are goin
, but neither do i see it as very helpful in pressing russia on issues like iran or their conduct towards syria. russian opposition level leaders, however, and russian civil society, and the russian press, what free press remains in russia today really support this legislation. and i think what this legislation intends is sort of a mutually beneficial relationship with russia based on a rule of law. based on human rights. that's the hope. it includes the sergei magnitsky legislation that came out of the foreign affairs committee of which i am an original co-sponsor, and i do think we owe a debt of gratitude to chairman ros-lehtinen for her determination to have that provision in the legislation. and i think if we reflect on the words of the russian opposition in their parliament, one said recently, this provision is very pro-russian. it helps defend us in russia from criminals. it helps defend us from criminals who kill our citizens, who steal our money, and hide it abroad. and that's the point. that's what we are trying to do with that provision. and this bill liberalizing trade while at the s
, syria, the islamic republic of iran and the united states of america. well, harold coe says, what a disgrace. how can the united states be a world leader on women's rights and not sign this treaty? well, let's take a look. what would radification mean? we don't have to guess what ratification means. the american bar association has written a book-length report, 200 pages, explaining exactly what american compliance would mean. the aba report is based on the work of the u.n. monitoring committees. they go to the countries when they ratify the treaty. so when they went to britain or australia or canada, they wrote a report. what were they telling these countries to do, how would you follow the treaty? well, the aba report opposes thousands of questions, all of them potential lawsuits. the aba claims, first of all, it's not about equality under the law, it's about de facto equality; that is, equality of result, statistical equality. the aba states gender quotas are not voluntary, it creates an obligation for a quota system. so i'm just going to run through a few of these questions fr
in just a few minutes time for more on that vote. the u.s. state department has con determined syria for launching another assault on its people. the communication shutdown comes as fighting forced today h damascus airport to close thursday night. is now the time for the international community to adopt a tougher stance this we're joined by madeleine albright, former u.s. secretary of state. madame secretary, thanks very much for joining us. >> good to be with you. thank you. >> we'd like to know straight away whether it's time now for the international community and especially the u.s. toed a don't a tou to adopt a tough every stance with regard to syria. >> i'm sure the international community and the united states are taking -- paying very close attention to what is going on and they have been taking pretty tough instances in terms of making clear support for this coalition of the rebel groups and also in terms of looking at what turkey needs and generally how to make clear that the international community believes that saddam hussein's -- sorry, that bashir assad's time is over.
to your broader question republicans will continue to respect and follow his advice and syria is the next big issue that he is pounding away on. he was at a forum at the newseum yesterday and crying out for american leadership on syria which means more involvement and there are a lot of big issues he has a huge influence on because of his experience, respect and personal history. this issue i'm not so sure they'll follow him on but two or three have said they're putting holds on a nomination. no bell laureate economists nominated for the federal reserve who was finally withdrew his name after a year of waiting because he was not going to be -- >> consumer. >> and the consumer protection service agency, elizabeth warren's former agency so you have people all over the place, judges -- >> ambassadors. >> when lindsey graham mentioned yesterday was john boughten and that was, okay, a warning because john was not confirmed for u.n. ambassador then was a recess appointee. no way the president will nominate a secretary of state as a recess appointee. you cannot with credible lead diplomacy over
remember the mortar shells coming from syria, we heard for the third time in just a week, there has been something coming in from syria into israel, a soldier from the israeli military was injured by shrapnel coming in from syria today. back to you. >> brian: thanks so much. >> steve: be careful. >> gretchen: now the other stories making headlines. it's official. jon corzine thanked mf global. his bad management decisions led to the firm's bankruptcy and loss of $1.6 billion in customers' money. specifically the report says that he created an atmosphere where no one could challenge his decisions. corzine used to be the democratic governor of new jersey. >> steve: meanwhile, it could have been him. this morning we're hearing from the owner of the plane that crashed into a home leaving three people dead. roger latham was supposed to be on the plane with three pilots heading to an faa safety conference. at the last minute, he decided to go hunting instead. >> horrible thing. i don't really know what to say about that. i kind of feel guilty in some sense. >> steve: he is awe live. the pilots
jeunesse, thank you. live in l.a. watching that story for us. martha? martha: in syria people are losing access now to the outside world as fighting continues between rebels and government troops. a paralyzing situation. we're live in the middle east. bill: also immigration, health care, two of the biggest stories and they're both happening in the state of arizona. governor jan brewer is here to defend some of her recent decisions live. we'll talk to her in a moment. i'm only in my 60's... i've got a nice long life ahead. big plans. so when i found out medicare doesn't pay all my medical expenses, i got a medicare supplement insurance plan. [ male announcer ] if you're eligible for medicare, you may know it only covers about 80% of your part b medical expenses. the rest is up to you. call and find out about an aarp medicare supplement insurance plan, insured by unitedhealthcare insurance company. like all standardized medicare supplement plans, it could save you thousands in out-of-pocket costs. call now to request your free decision guide. i've been with my doctor for 12 years. now i kn
, and the rebels in syria showing more and more strength and gaining more and more territory. we have a lot to talk about this morning. good to have you with us. don't forget, you can join the conversation any time at 866-55-press. on twitter@bp show on facebook facebook.com/billpressshow. and there is this great little fun thing called the chat room going on all through the next three hours. we go to current.com and click on the chat room. join other listeners on your local progressive talk radio station. talk about the issues we are talking about. there we go. team press put in a whole week. >> believe it or not. >> talking points this week. peter ogburn. >> all right. >> with sipcyprian bowlding. and he is still -- i know, you think he has spent six bucks yet. >> four bucks. i don't know. i don't know how he spent it. >> to dinner last night. >> could have bought a hot dog. can't even get a cup of coffee at starbucks. >> showing off his winnings his singles. make it rain, cyprian. you have four singles. yes. >> four singles. >> yeah. >> all right. w
've got huge turmoil and revolution in this region. syria, iran, problems all over. but this issue here, and we're standing right here in jerusalem now between the israelis and the palestinians it remains of fundamental importance. >> for more reaction on the world's leaders, christiane amanpour joins us from new york. good to see you, of course, as always. you know, we know the president has a really complicated relationship with israeli prime minister benjamin netanyahu and has not always been smooth sailing here. and it's no secret that he was rooting for mitt romney this go-around in the election. we've seen a statement from netanyahu. how has he responded? what kind of influence do you think the president has now in terms of dealing with him? >> well, mr. netanyahu, the prime minister, has sent a congratulations to president obama on his re-election and talking about secure and strong relationship between both countries and willingness to keep work with the united states president. on the issue tony blair was talking about, israeli/palestinian peace process, there's been no movemen
situation in syria, iran and its nuclear efforts and immigration reform just to name a few. ed henry joins us live from the white house. >> reporter: they may be in celebration mode still. after the euphoria of victory the president taking congratulatory calls from 13 leaders who have called in the last 24 hours saying congratulations. but that euphoria giving way to a lot of challenges on the world stage and the domestic as well. the fiscal cliff is bubbling up quickly. while you have democratic leaders suggesting they have a strong hand in the negotiations and they will cooperate with republicans. you have republicans saying if the president raises taxes in these negotiations it could blow up on democrats. take a listen. >> i'm going to do everything within my power to be as conciliatory as possible. i want to work together, but i what everyone to also understand you can't push us around. >> i think it will require tax increases on the wealthy. the wealthy are the people who hire everyone else. you can't love jobs and hate job creators, martha. he hates job creators. >> reporter: the res
sending missile parts to syria. we've talked about the relationship between north korea and the middle east before. this is the first we've heard of this and this happened a couple of months ago. what do you make of it, what is the involvement we need to watch. >> this is a continuation of a trend because the north koreans have been not only selling missiles but nuclear reactors. the reactor destroyed in 2007, that was a north korean reactor. iran paid for it. the united states has not been paying enough attention to north korean proliferation. jenna: there is so much to watch, gordon how do you prioritize. >> that is the real problem, the crises is come one right after the other. it will be very difficult for the administration or even a bunch of countries to be able to deal with this because there is too much happening all at once. jenna: it certainly feels that way. you give us a lot of thins to think about. it's good to have you on set. thank you. appreciate it very much. jon: a couple of icons of the american lunch box could be no more. we might be seeing the last of the twinninge
, the conflict would probably be spreading to syria, creating one large issue. withdrawing from the western part of afghanistan. it would be disruptive of the security of oil flowing through the strait of hormuz. and there is a further uncertainty involved in that kind of an operation common namely how successful would be, in fact. and estimates regarding israel's potential to be decisively effective and estimates depend on the scale of the american attack. even a relatively modest attack by the united states would inflict serious casualties when the ratings for this for precipitation of the spirit are still unknown factors of what happens. there will be a significant factor of human casualties, particularly in places that are larger than some facilities, that have been destroyed or relocated. all of that makes an attack not a very attractive remedy for dealing with the problem. a problem which then would pale with significance compared to the consequences of the attack once the dynamic concept was set in motion. so i dismiss that serious alternative. i think it would be an act of utter irrespon
considering potential success of the operation against the facility in syria. and this will all remove iran's constraints to acquire nuclear weapons. so we are either -- really concerned with the situation. let me add people of iran will continue to suffer under very tough sanctions. so there are two things which must change. diplomacy and the inspections. first diplomacy. five plus one has served the purpose of the it united front. five plus one mean to me united nations security council related global responsibility, europeans like to prefer three plus three which means the european union is the major player. i'm nervous about that, if you are europe you had better say three plus three otherwise you will not be served your dinner. five plus one, of course, it is important to keep on. i think u.s. should not do what it has done, hide inside this group. u.s. has now tried to take responsibility. to change, to start with its relations with iran. isn't it time now to sort of give up on the occupation of the u.s. embassy in connection with islamic revolution 1979? should the iranians try to fo
in the worth the misery of refugees in the 60 years in camps in lebanon and syria and the people of gaza by the israeli blockade in the west bank occupation. so why is it that he makes a statement today, which in effect says the u.s. and israel's diplomatic object is our holding a veto over our vote at the u.n. tomorrow? canal from the side of history not talk about them though for unconditional recognition of palestine? >> i don't think i was talking about the hand of history. cozy tony blair phrase. most mac but i go back to this point that we need a negotiation. he asked why the opinions of israel and the united states matter so much. that's because we will only help alleviate the problem and hope decisively those people with the negotiated settlement with israel. that means of course one has to allow for opinion in israel as well, which is the nation in the world that has the closest relationships with israel, the biggest leverage of the foreign policy decisions and the united states and that is why we have to have new regard for their opinion as well. that is the practical and diplo
Search Results 0 to 36 of about 37 (some duplicates have been removed)

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